SCaLE 17x

Last week, I attended the 17th annual Southern California Linux Expo (SCaLE 17x). SCaLE is a conference that I’ve wanted to go to for years, so I’m glad I finally made it. Located at the Pasadena Convention Center, it’s a short walk from nearby hotels, restaurants, and a huge independent bookstore. Plus the weather in southern California almost always beats Indiana — particularly in March.

Having done this a few times before, the SCaLE organizers know how to put on a good event. Code of Conduct information, including contacts, is prominently posted right as you walk in the door. Staff walk around with t-shirts that sport the WiFi information. The break between sessions is 30 minutes, which allows ample time to get from one to another without having to brush people aside if you meet them in the hallway. It was an incredibly-well run conference.

I ended up in the “mentoring” track most of the weekend, which I suppose indicates where I am in this point of my career. “Mentoring” may not be the right word, though. The talks in that room covered being a community organizer, developer advocacy, and a lot about mental health. Quite a bit about mental health, in fact. It’s probably a good thing that we’re discussing these topics more openly at conferences.

The talk that stuck with me the most, though, was one I saw on Sunday afternoon. Bradley Kuhn wondered “if open source isn’t sustainable, maybe free software is.” Bradley compared the budgets and the output of large corporate-backed foundations and smaller projects like phpMyAdmin. I’ll go deeper on that later, either when I recap the Open Source Leadership Summit or in a standalone post.

Bradley also used an “It’s a Wonderful Life” analogy, which is very much my kind of analogy. This may become a longer post at some point, but the general idea is that we have a lot of Sam Wainwrights in the world: people who are willing to throw money at a problem (perhaps with strings attached). Despite being well-meaning, they’re not actually doing that much to help. What we need is more George Baileys: people doing the small but critical work in their communities to help them thrive.

SCaLE was a terrific conference, and I’m looking forward to going back in the future. Especially now that I’ve learned my way around the food scene a little bit.