Moderators’ Choice Award

As regular readers are aware, I am a Community Moderator for Opensource.com. This involves writing and recruiting content, tending to comments, and the like. On Wednesday, I learned that my fellow moderators selected me to receive this year’s Moderators’ Choice Award.

I struggle to find the words to express how honored I am. The Community Moderator team is incredible, not only in terms of their knowledge and writing ability, but as people. It’s a privilege to be counted among them. That they selected me for recognition is unbelievable. From my perspective, it’s all I can do to keep up.

I know this sounds way overdone, but it is fully sincere. It’s truly a pleasure to work with the team, including the Red Hat staff and the community at large. This is a great way to start the year, and I’m really looking forward to continuing my contributions.

Congratulations to all of the other community award winners this year. The community is what makes the site great.

Other writing in October 2016

Where have I been writing when I haven’t been writing here?

Over on Opensource.com, we had our second-ever month with a million page views! While I didn’t have any articles published, I did agree to coordinate the Doc Dish column, so there’s that.

Meanwhile, I wrote or edited a few things for work, too:

I also spoke at the All Things Open conference in Raleigh, NC. It went okay.

Other writings in September 2016

Where have I been writing when I haven’t been writing here?

Over on Opensource.com, we had another 900k+ page views in the month: the fourth time in site history and the second consecutive month. I contributed two articles:

Meanwhile, I wrote a few things for work, too:

  • Cycle Computing: The cloud startup that just keeps kicking — The Next Platform wrote a very nice article about us, so I wrote a blog post talking about how nice it was. (Hey, I’m in marketing now. It’s what we do).
  • Cloud-Agnostic Glossary — Supporting multiple cloud-service providers means having to translate terms between them. I put together a Rosetta Stone to help translate relevant terms between AWS, Azure, and Google Cloud.
  • The question isn’t cost, it’s value — When people talk about the cost of cloud computing, they’re usually looking at the raw dollar value. Since it takes money to make money, that’s not always the right way to look at it. It’s better to consider the value generated.

August Opensource.com articles

It was another great month for Opensource.com. We had our second most page views and while I’m not saying it’s because I published three articles (after a nearly three-month hiatus), I’m just saying. ?

Speaking of writing for Opensource.com, October is our “Most Open Month”, when we try extra hard to feature new writers. Visit https://opensource.com/story and tell us your open source story.

Anyway, here are the articles I wrote last month:

April Opensource.com articles

Well, Opensource.com didn’t set any monthly traffic records this time around, but it was still another great month. I stepped up my contribution game this month, too:

March Opensource.com articles

I ended up only writing one article for Opensource.com this month, but it turned out to be pretty popular, garnering well over 10,000 views. However, that’s nothing compared to the over one million views the whole site had in the month of March. The final total is roughly 200,000 more than the previous monthly record. I’d like to congratulate the editorial team, my fellow Community Moderators, and all of the other Red Hat & community contributors who have worked so hard to reach this milestone. I’m honored to be a part of such a great team.

February Opensource.com articles

February was a great month for Opensource.com. We set records in daily page views, unique visitors, and traffic from search. Two of my articles were published in February:

December Opensource.com articles

Here are the articles I wrote for Opensource.com in December:

November Opensource.com articles

I’ve decided to make this a regular thing: near the beginning of every month, I’ll recap the articles I’ve written for Opensource.com in the previous month. This seems better than scattershot posts that may or may not include all of my articles. So here’s November: