Moving the website to Lektor

Years ago, I moved all of funnelfiasco.com (except the blog, which runs on WordPress) from artisinally hand-crafted HTML to using a static site generator. At the time, I chose a project called “blatter” which used jinja2 templates to generate a site. This gave me the opportunity to change basic information across the whole site at once. Not something I do often, but it’s a pain when I do.

Unfortunately, blatter was apparently quietly abandoned by the developer. This wasn’t really a problem until Python 2 reached end of life. Fedora (reasonably) retired much of the Python 2 ecosystem. I tried to port it to Python 3, but ran into a few problems. And frankly, the idea of taking on the maintenance burden for a project that hadn’t been updated in years was not at all appealing. So I went looking for something else.

I wanted to find something that used jinja2 in order to minimize the amount of work involved. I also wanted something focused on websites, not blogs specifically. It seems like so many platforms today are blog-first. That’s fine, it’s just not what I want. After some searching and a little bit of trial and error, I ended up selecting Lektor.

The good

Lektor is written in (primarily) Python 3 and uses jinja2 templates, so it hit my most important points. It has a command to run a local webserver for testing. In addition, you can set up multiple servers configurations for deployment. So I can have the content sync to my local web server to verify it and then deploy that to my “production” webserver. Builds are destructive, but the deploys are not, which means I don’t have to shoe-horn everything into Lektor.

Another great feature is the ability to programmatically generate thumbnails of images. I’ve made a little bit of use of that for the time being. In the future, especially if I ever go storm chasing again, I can see myself using that feature a lot more.

Lektor optionally supports writing the page content in markdown. I haven’t done this much since I was migrating pre-written content. I expect new content will be much markdownier. Markdown isn’t flexible enough for a lot of web purposes, but it covers some use cases well. Why write HTML when it’s not needed?

Lektor uses databags to provide input data to templates. I do this using JSON files. Complex operations with that are a lot easier than the embedded Python data structures that Blatter supported.

If I were interested in translating my site into multiple languages, Lektor has good support for that (including changing URLs). It also has a built-in admin and editing console, which is not something I use, but I can see the appeal.

The bad

Unlike Blatter, Lektor puts contents and templates in separate files. This makes it a little more difficult to special-case a specific site.

It also has a “one directory, one file” paradigm. Directories can have “attachments”, which can include html files, but they won’t get processed, so they need to stand alone. This is not such an issue if you’re starting from scratch. Since I’m not, it was more of a headache. You can overwrite the page’s slug, but that also makes certain assumptions.

For the Forecast Discussion Hall of Fame, I wanted to keep URLs as-is. That site has been linked to from a lot of places, and I’d hate to break those inbound links. Writing an htaccess file to redirect to the new URLs didn’t sound ideal either. I ended up writing a one-line patch that passed the argument I need to the python-slugify library. I tried to do it the right way so that it would be configurable, but it was beyond my skill to do so.

The big down side is the fact that the development has ground to a halt. It’s not abandoned, but the development activity happens in spurts. Right now it’s doing what I need it to do, but I worry at some point I’ll have to make a switch again. I’d like to contribute more upstream, but my skills are not advanced enough for this.

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