Open Source Leadership Summit 2019

Ed. note: my employer is a member of the Linux Foundation. The views in this post are — as are all posts on this site — my personal views and do not represent my employer or any other organizations. You knew this already, but I thought it would be good to remind you.

Last week, after leaving SCaLE, I headed to Half Moon Bay, California for the Open Source Leadership Summit. It’s an invitation-only conference run by the Linux Foundation. This year it was held at the Ritz-Carlton Half Moon Bay, a very nice resort hotel with an ocean view. This was dramatically different from most tech conferences I’ve attended previously. That difference was the source of some internal struggle I wrestled with. I’ll get to that momentarily, but first my more general thoughts.

This is clearly not a typical tech conference. The number of technical sessions was pretty low, with a greater focus on topics like marketing, balancing corporate & community interests, mentoring, et cetera. Given that the target audience is leaders of corporate open source efforts, this makes sense. The talks I attended were good, with Jim Perrin’s “Damaging your project with management (and leadership)” as my clear favorite. The downside is that with 30-minute time slots, I didn’t feel like there was ever enough time to really get deep into any of the topics. That might be better for the state my attention span was in after over a week of travel and conferences, but it’s not great for getting a lot of value out of the talks.

The marketing panel that I was on was well-received. I thought we did well. Panels can be terrific or terrible and I’d like to think we were closer to the terrific end of the spectrum. All of the panelists had different, complimentary experience, so we were able to give non-repetitive answers. And we all kept our answers pretty short so that the conversation could flow. The audience was into it, as well, which always helps. And I’m glad to say that “Jennifer”s outnumbered men.

So now for my internal struggle. I saw the conference referred to as “open source Davos” and it’s hard to disagree with that. Jessie Frazelle was unrestrained in her criticism:

Coming on the heels of Bradley Kuhn’s “It’s a Wonderful Life” analogy at SCaLE, this criticism really stuck out to me. Yes, I get paid well to work on an open source project, but I still live in a world where staying at a resort like the Ritz-Carlton Half Moon Bay leaves me wide-eyed. How many tech conference travels could we have funded with the budget for lunches? How much test gear could be provided for the cost of the evening socials? Why is it called “Open Source Leadership Summit” when the leaders of major open source projects aren’t invited to attend?

Well the answer to that question is “this isn’t the sort of leadership we meant”. A friend said this is the sort of event that corporate execs and senior management attend. If you want to get your message to them, that’s what you have to do. I understand that argument, and the practical side of me gets it. The ideological side of me says “well then we’ll do it without them!”

The Linux Foundation and similar foundations are trade associations, not charities. They’re not obligated to act in the public good. Maybe they could stand do to a little more of that, obligated or no. But ultimately, they’re doing what trade associations do. They advance their corporate interests in the way they see fit. If we want to redirect them toward community benefit, maybe pitching talks that give the message we want them to hear is the approach to take. Or maybe that’s just what I’ll tell myself to justify going on a junket.

2 thoughts on “Open Source Leadership Summit 2019

  1. I think the next responsible step might be to figure out how to get some of that sweet, sweet junket money to spill over into helping projects.

    I do understand the reason for the summit and LF, but they really should do something to help out those lone maintainers working on critical components of the open source ecosystem (ssl/tzdata/etc).

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