Avoiding being a remote hermit

Last week I wrote a little bit about my experience working from home. I mentioned that I sometimes work from a local coworking space to get away from the noise of my kids. What I didn’t say is that I do it to be around people — because I don’t. I like being social, but I don’t feel like I miss anything working from home.

I leave the house more often than I’d probably choose to. I think my record is eight days without leaving the house, but it’s almost always much shorter than that. Sometimes it’s as simple as taking the kids to school in the morning. Other times I actually go do things with my friends. But I can’t say I’ve ever felt the need to work from not-house just to be around people.

Part of that is that I often interact with people over text (e.g. Twitter, instant messaging, etc) anyway. In my jobs, I’ve always been able to be relatively available online, so I’m able to keep in touch when I need interaction. And I often spent time on the phone or in video calls with people, so I got that higher-bandwidth interaction, too.

But I can see how someone freelancing or otherwise not interacting with coworkers regularly can quickly become a recluse. The Trello blog recently ran an article about avoiding becoming a hermit. I read it thinking “yeah, this is good advice but I take a slightly different approach.”

For example, I don’t dress up in “work clothes”. I wear shorts and a t-shirt when it’s warm and add more clothing when it gets colder. But I do have a rule that I won’t wear pajamas unless I’m sick. I don’t need slacks and a collared shirt to feel like I’m at work, but wearing pajamas is basically an invitation to not even bother.

I also don’t watch TV during the work day, with rare exception (hello, NCAA tournament!). But I do listen to podcasts. I frequently notice that I don’t really pay attention to what’s been said; they’re really more like background noise a lot of the time. Except when I need to focus on reading, the podcasts don’t really get in the way. I can even write with a podcast playing most of the time.

Overall, not leaving the house is one of the benefits of working from home for me. Life forces me out of the house enough, and I’m just social enough, that I can still get the human interaction I need. Your mileage may vary.

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