Tech is a garbage industry filled with people making garbage decisions

I work with some great people in the tech space. But the fact that there are terrific people in tech is not a valid reason to ignore how garbage our industry can be. It’s not even that we do bad things intentionally, we’re just oblivious to the possible bad outcomes. There are a number of paths by which I could come to this conclusion, but two recent stories prompted this post.

Can you track me now?

The first was an article last Tuesday that revealed AT&T, T-Mobile, and Sprint made it really easy to track the location of a phone for just a few hundred dollars. They’ve all promised to cut off that service (of course, John Legere of T-Mobile has said that before) and Congress is taking an interest. But the question remains: who thought this was a good idea? Oh sure, I bet they made some money off of it. But did no one in a decision-making capacity stop and think “how might this be abused?” Could a domestic abuser fork over $300 to find the shelter their victim escaped to? This puts people’s lives in danger. Would you be surprised if we learned someone had died because their killer could track them in real time?

It just looks like AI

And then on Thursday, we learned that Ring’s security system is very insecure. As Sam Biddle reported, Ring kept unencrypted customer video in S3 buckets that were widely available across the company. All you needed was the customer’s email address and you could watch their videos. The decision to keep the videos unencrypted was deliberate because (pre-acquisition by Amazon), company leadership felt it would diminish the value of the company.

I haven’t seen any reporting that would indicate the S3 bucket was publicly viewable, but even if it wasn’t, it’s a huge risk to take with customer data. One configuration mistake and you could expose thousands of people’s homes to public viewing. Not to mention that anyone on the inside could still use their access to spy on the comings and goings of people they knew.

If that wasn’t bad enough, it turns out that much of the object recognition that Ring touted wasn’t done by AI at all. Workers in the Ukraine were manually labeling objects in the video. Showing customer video to employees wasn’t just a side effect of their design, it was an intentional choice.

This is bad in ways that extend beyond this example:

Bonus: move fast and brake things?

I’m a little hesitant to include this since the full story isn’t known yet, but I really love my twist on the “move fast and break things” mantra. Lime scooters in Switzerland were stopping abruptly and letting inertia carry the rider forward to unpleasant effect. Tech Crunch reported that it could be due to software updates happening mid-ride, rebooting the scooter. Did no one think that might happen, or did they just not test it?

Technology won’t save us

I’m hardly the first to say this, but we have to stop pretending that technology is inherently good. I’m not even sure we can say it’s neutral at this point. Once it gets into the hands of people, it is being used to make our lives worse in ways we don’t even understand. We cannot rely on technology to save us.

So how do we fix this? Computer science and similar programs (or really all academic programs) should include ethics courses as mandatory parts of the curriculum. Job interviews should include questions about ethics, not just technical questions. I commit to asking questions about ethical considerations in every job interview I conduct. Companies have to ask “how can this be abused?” as an early part of product design, and they must have diverse product teams so that they get more answers. And we must, as a society, pay for journalism that holds these companies to account.

The only thing that can save us is ourselves. We have to take out our own garbage.

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