Fedora 24 upgrade

Fedora 24 was released last week, so of course I had to upgrade my machines. As has become the norm, there weren’t any serious issues, but I hit a few annoyances this time around. The first was due to packages in the RPMFusion repos not being signed. This isn’t Fedora’s fault, as RPMFusion is a completely separate project. And it was temporary: by the time I upgraded my laptop on Sunday night, the packages had all been signed.

Several packages had to be dropped by using the –allowerasing argument to dnf. Mostly these were packages installed from RPMFusion, but there were a couple of Fedora packages as well.

The biggest annoyance was that post-upgrade, I had no graphical login. I had to explicitly start the desktop manager service with:

systemctl enable kdm
systemctl start kdm

kdm had previously been enabled on both machines, but the upgrade nuked that in both cases. It looks like I’m not the only person to hit this: https://bugzilla.redhat.com/show_bug.cgi?id=1337546

And now, my traditional meaningless torrent stats!

Here’s my seeding ratios for Fedora 23:

Flavor i686 x86_64
KDE 16.2 35.6
Security 10.3 21.1
Workstation 30.9 46.7
Server 17.5 25.0

The “ratio ratio” as I call it is a comparison of seeding ratios between the two main architectures:

Flavor x86_64:i686
KDE 2.20
Security 2.05
Workstation 1.51
Server 1.43

So what does all of this tell us? Nothing, of course. Just because someone downloads a torrent that doesn’t mean they use it. Still, if we pretend that it’s a proxy for usage, all of the seeding ratios are higher than on the last release day. That tells me that Fedora is becoming more popular (yay!). 64-bit architectures are continuing to be a larger portion of the pie, as well.

Now that I’m starting to build a record of these, I can start reporting trends with the Fedora 25 release.

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