Further defense of 140 characters

Last fall, when rumors began swirling that Twitter was looking at increasing the 140 character limit on tweets, I wrote a defense of the 140 character constraint. Last week, Re/Code and others reported that the limit change may come in March and that it could be as large as 10,000 characters.

Everything I wrote back in October still holds true. 140 characters, now that SMS is no longer a primary method of interacting with Twitter, is probably to small. But 10,000 is too large. The first four paragraphs of this post are 1,244 characters. Can you imagine a timeline full of that (or more)?

It’s not just “oh noes! They are changing a thing!”, which is a common reaction whenever Facebook changes anything. Twitter has made a lot of changes that I think are great: retweets (yes, kids, retweets used to be a manual process that often required editing the tweet in order to be able to fit “MT @name” in front of it), quoted tweets, embedded images, polls (even though there’s a lot to be improved on there), and 10k character direct messages.

In this case, the short limit is what makes Twitter. As my friend Zachary Baiel said “The medium is the message. The character limit of Twitter defines itself. Otherwise, it’s a stream of blogs.”

Twitter emphasized four characteristics in its IPO filing (thanks to Karen Demerly for bringing this to my attention):

  • Public
  • Real Time
  • Conversational
  • Distributed

10,000 characters does not seem very real time (it takes a while to type that out and longer to read a lot of them) and certainly not conversational (perhaps more a series of short speeches). There’s been some talk of the UI presenting a “read more” kind of option, and as a co-maintainer of a Twitter client, I’m inclined to resist having to make changes to my application.

But more than just laziness, I think 10k is actively harmful. Whenever a new feature is announced, the biggest complaint I see is “why aren’t you addressing abuse instead?” I get it, abuse is a hard subject to deal with, particularly on an unmoderated medium such as Twitter. One way that abuse happens is that abusers get their followers to dogpile the mentions of the target. Imagine how many targets you could include in 10,000 characters.

More innocuously (even though I find it super annoying), is the phenomenon of “I took a picture of some weather, let me tag all of the meteorologists in my market so that they’ll see it any maybe retweet me or put it on the news broadcast.” Those people will certainly make use of the extra characters, but it will add nothing to the conversation, only make it worse.

I get it, Twitter stock is plummeting. (Full disclosure: I own a few shares and expect to get quite the tax write-off from them.) There’s a lot of pressure to improve revenue, user engagement, and (most importantly to the people applying the pressure) the stock price. But this change will just make the user experience worse, and that doesn’t seem to be a reasonable way for Twitter to turn itself around.

I’m hoping that 10,000 is just a trial balloon. Nobody seems committed to making that the final number, so hopefully when the feature lands, it’s more reasonable. Or not. Will I stop using Twitter if the character limit changes to 10,000? Not right away. Maybe I will at some point, though.

By the way, this entire post (including this line), checks in at 3,398 characters.

1 thought on “Further defense of 140 characters

  1. I like scrolling through my timeline, knowing all the posts will be scannable at their limited character length. I do, though, click for more sometimes, and it looks as though that’s how the longer tweets would work.

    I’ve been annoyed by the things ppl do to get around the limits, like long tweet strings and text in images, so I welcome the option of a longer text body. If twitter implements it right, I don’t think the scrolling through a timeline of brief text chunks will change very much…

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