Severe weather outlooks on TV

At the end of October, the Storm Prediction Center changed the categories used in severe weather outlooks in order to more clearly communicate risk. These outlooks, like many NWS products, started as a way of communicating information to other meteorologists, emergency managers, et cetera. Though they weren’t designed with public consumption in mind, social science has helped to shape some of the changes. The Internet means that weather products are available to anyone who is looking for them.

What I’ve noticed since then is that not all of the local TV stations have gone along for the ride. A while ago, I asked one of the local meteorologists about this. His station discussed it internally and decided fewer categories made for less viewer confusion. I don’t have any reason to dispute that.

Severe weather outlook from the Storm Prediction Center.

Severe weather outlook from the Storm Prediction Center.

Severe weather outlook from NBC affiliate WXIN.

Severe weather outlook from NBC affiliate WXIN.

Severe weather outlook from CW affiliate WISH.

Severe weather outlook from CW affiliate WISH.

Severe weather outlook from Fox affiliate WXIN.

Severe weather outlook from Fox affiliate WXIN.

My main concern isn’t that the station doesn’t use the same categories as the SPC, but that different stations in the market use different categories. Of course, they should do what they think is in the best interests of their viewers. I’m certainly not suggesting there be mandatory unification. At the same time, I think stations having different risk categories is more confusing to the public than adding “marginal” and “enhanced” categories. Then again, TV weather seems to be one place that people have a specific and unwavering loyalty. Outside of weather weenies, I’m not sure there are too many people who would even notice differences between stations.

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