FAQs are not the place to vent

I’ve spent a lot of my professional life explaining technical concepts to not-necessarily-very-technical people. Most of the time (but sadly not all of it), it’s because the person doesn’t need to fully understand the technology, they just need to know enough to effectively do their job. I understand how frustrating it can be to answer what seems like an obvious question, and how the frustration compounds when the question is repeated. That’s why we maintain FAQ pages, so we can give a consistently friendly answer to a question.

You can imagine my dismay when my friend Andy shared an FAQ entry he found recently. A quantum chemistry application’s FAQ page includes this question: “How do I choose the number of processors/How do I setup my parallel calculation?” It’s a very reasonable question to ask. Unfortunately, the site answers it thusly: “By asking this question, you demonstrate your lack of basic understanding of how parallel machines work and how parallelism is implemented in Quantum ESPRESSO. Please go back to the previous point.”

The previous question is similar and has an answer of of “See Section 3 of the User Guide for an introduction to how parallelism is implemented in Quantum ESPRESSO”. Now that’s a pretty good answer. Depending on the depth of information in Section 3, it might be possible to answer the question directly on the FAQ page with an excerpt, but at least pointing the visitor to the information is a good step.

I don’t understand getting frustrated with a repeated FAQ. If the answers are so similar, copy and paste them. Or combine the questions. FAQs, user guides, and the like are great because you can compose them in a detached manner and edit them to make sure they’re correct, approachable, and not jerkish. FAQs are an opportunity to prevent frustration, not to express it.

1 thought on “FAQs are not the place to vent

  1. When I found this, the biggest issue I had with the response was that the question is perfectly valid for someone who’s just looking for a starting point. Obviously the answer to “How many cores should I use” is a lot more involved than just “Use 128 cores”. That doesn’t mean the user asking the question deserves to be insulted about their “lack of understanding.”

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