Amazon VPC: A great gotcha

If you’re not familiar with the Amazon Web Services offerings, one feature is the Virtual Private Cloud (VPC). VPC is effectively a way of walling yourself off from all or part of the world. If you’re running a public-facing web server, it might not be so important. If you’re running a compute cluster, it’s a no-brainer. Just be careful about that “no-brainer” part.

While working on a new cluster for a customer today, I was trying to figure out why the HTCondor scheduler wasn’t showing up to the collector. The daemons were all running. HTCondor security policies weren’t getting in the way. I could use condor_config_val from each host to query the other host. I brought in a colleague to double-check me. He couldn’t figure it out either.

After beating our heads against the wall for a while, and finding absolutely nothing helpful in the logs, I noticed one tiny detail in the logs. The schedd kept saying it was updating the collector, but the collector never seemed to notice. The schedd kept saying it was updating the collector via UDP. How many times had I watched that line go by?

The last time, though, it clicked. And it clicked hard. I had set up a security group to allow all traffic within the VPC. Except I had set it for all TCP traffic, so the UDP packets were being silently dropped. As UDP packets are wont to do. When I changed the security group rule from TCP to all protocols, the scheduler magically appeared in the pool.

Once again, the moral of the story is: don’t be stupid.

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