Log file myopia

I like to consider myself an enlightened sysadmin. I know I’m supposed to think outside the box from 30,000 feet. Still, every so often, my blinders come back on and I tend to be a bit myopic. This is most common when looking at log files in search of clues to an unknown problem.  A recent example was when I was trying to figure out why the Condor startd wasn’t running on a CentOS VM I had set up.

Since I didn’t want to have hundreds of ‘localhost.localdomain’s in the pool, I needed a way to give each VM a unique-ish and relevant name.  The easiest way seemed to be to check against a web server and use the output of a CGI script to set the host name.  Sounds simple enough, but after I put that in place the startd would immediately segfault.

I had no idea why, so I started peeking through the log file for the startd.  Lots of information there, but nothing particularly helpful.  After several hours of cross-eyed log reading and fruitless Googling, I thought I’d give strace a try.  I don’t know much about system-level programming, but I thought something might provide a clue.  Alas, it was not to be.

Eventually, I remembered that there’s a master log for Condor as well, and I decided to look in there.  Well, actually, I had looked in there earlier in the day and hadn’t seen anything that I thought was helpful.  This time I took a closer look and realized that it couldn’t resolve its host name and that’s why it was failing.

A few minutes later and I had changed the network setup to add the hostname to /etc/hosts so that Condor could resolve it’s host name.  A whole day’s worth of effort because I got too focused in on the wrong log file.

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